Plenary Speakers2019-04-11T00:08:43+00:00

Plenary 1

To be announced

James Bellingham

Director of Center for Marine Robotics
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

James Bellingham

Director of Center for Marine Robotics
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Biography

James G. Bellingham is the founding Director of the Center of Marine Robotics at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). Dr. Bellingham joined WHOI from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), where he was first Director of Engineering and then Chief Technologist. Prior to MBARI, he founded the Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Laboratory at MIT Sea Grant (1988) and co-founded Bluefin Robotics (1997). Bluefin is a Massachusetts-based company that develops, builds and operates autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and was acquired by Battelle in 2005. His research activities revolve around creation of autonomous marine robots and their use at sea. He pioneered the development of small, high performance Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), resulting in a class of systems which are now widely used within the military, industry and scientific communities. He was instrumental in developing and demonstrating distributed system approaches to ocean observing, leading the Autonomous Ocean Sampling Network program which coupled fleets of AUVs to ocean models to observe and predict ocean conditions. Dr. Bellingham has spent considerable time at sea, leading over 20 AUV expeditions in locations such as the Antarctic, North Atlantic, Mediterranean, South Pacific, and the Arctic. He has served on numerous advisory committees and boards, including Chairing the Naval Research Advisory Committee and serving on several National Academies studies. His awards include the Lockheed Martin Award for Ocean Science and Engineering and the MIT Fourteenth Robert Bruce Wallace lecturer. He received an B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Plenary 2

Tracking and prediction for autonomous maritime collision avoidance

Edmund Brekke

Associate Professor, Department of Engineering Cybernetics
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Edmund Brekke

Associate Professor, Department of Engineering Cybernetics
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Biography

Edmund Brekke received the M.Sc. degree in industrial mathematics in 2005, and the Ph.D. degree in engineering cybernetics in 2010, both from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. From 2010 to 2014, he worked with the Acoustic Research Laboratory (ARL), NUS in Singapore as a postdoctoral Research Fellow. In 2014 he rejoined NTNU and the Department of Engineering Cybernetics as an Associate Professor. In 2015-2019 he has been Project Manager for the Autosea project, developing methods for sensor fusion and collision avoidance for autonomous surface vehicles. He is an affiliated scientist at the Centre for Autonomous Marine Operations and Systems (AMOS), and a key scientist for the Autoferry project, which is developing an autonomous pedestrian ferry in Trondheim. He is an associate editor of the IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering. Brekke¹s research interests are in the area of sensor fusion and situational awareness, with a particular focus on multi-target tracking.

Abstract

Collision avoidance (COLAV) for autonomous surface vehicles can be consist of a sensing part and an avoidance part. In this presentation I will present a complete architecture for maritime COLAV systems, where multi-target tracking methods play a central role in the sensing part, and model-predictive control (MPC) algorithms are in control of the avoidance part. Key ideas include careful treatments of false alarms and detection probabilities in the tracking system, to mitigate the number of false tracks, and careful design of cost functions and manoeuver patterns in the MPC methods, to comply as much as possible with COLREGS, the traffic rules at sea. Several full-scale experiments demonstrate the robustness of the complete COLAV systems. Furthermore, the presentation will cover on-going research activities on long-term prediction techniques and cutting edge tracking methods, which will provide a new level of situational awareness in the next generation of COLAV methods

Plenary 3

20 Years of Simultaneous Localization and Mapping

José Neira

Professor, Department of Computer Science and Systems
University of Zaragoza

José Neira

Professor, Department of Computer Science and Systems
University of Zaragoza

Biography

Full professor at the Computer Science and Systems Engineering dept, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain.  José holds a degree in Computer Science Engineering from the Universidad de Los Andes in Colombia (1986), and a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Zaragoza (1993).  José teaches courses in Computer Programming, Computer Vision, Compiler Theory, Robotics and Machine Learning at the University of Zaragoza and also frequently as invited lecturer in many universities, research centers and conferences throughout the world.  He has been invited researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Oxford, Imperial College London, the Technical University of Munich, and the Instituto Superior Tecnico of Lisbon. José has published more than 50 books, journal papers and conference papers on the subject of perception for intelligent robots. He has served as associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Robotics, and has been invited editor for Robotics and Autonomous Systems, the Journal of Field Robotics, Autonomous Robots, and the IEEE Transactions on Robotics. José has been involved in the organization of many other scientific events, including RSS, ICRA, IROS, IJCAI, and AAAI.  José also is also involved as expert in the evaluation of FP7 and H2020 Research and Innovation programs of the European Commission, as well as the European Research Council grants programs.

Abstract

In this talk I will summarize the work that we have done in our lab in building SLAM systems, all the way from the first filtering implementations to ORB-SLAM. I will discuss some of the ideas that we have found to be general and useful to consider when developing a SLAM system, and how those ideas help tackle the challenges that a SLAM system faces regarding speed, accuracy, robustness and limited use of hardware resources.

Plenary 4

Snake Robot Control

Kirstin Y. Pattersen

Professor, Department of Engineering Cybernetics
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Kristin Ytterstad Pettersen

Professor, Department of Engineering Cybernetics
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Biography

Kristin Y. Pettersen is a Professor in the Department of Engineering Cybernetics, NTNU where she has been a faculty member since 1996. She was Head of Department 2011-2013, Vice-Head of Department 2009-2011, and Director of the NTNU ICT Program of Robotics 2010-2013. She is Adjunct Professor at the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI). In the period 2013 – 2022 she is also Key Scientist at the CoE Centre for Autonomous Marine Operations and Systems (NTNU AMOS). She is a co-founder of the NTNU spin-off company Eelume AS, where she was CEO 2015-2016.

She received the MSc and PhD degrees in Engineering Cybernetics at NTNU, Trondheim, Norway, in 1992 and 1996, respectively. She has published four books and more than 250 papers in international journals and refereed conferences. Her research interests focus on nonlinear control of mechanical systems with applications to robotics, with a special emphasis on marine robotics and snake robotics. She was awarded the IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology Outstanding Paper Award in 2006 and in 2017.

She was a nominated and elected member of the Board of Governors of IEEE Control Systems Society 2012 – 2014 and is currently a member of the IFAC Council. She has also held and holds several board positions in industrial and research companies. She was Program Chair of the IEEE Conference on Control Technology and Applications in 2018 and has served as Associate Editor for several IEEE CSS conferences. She has served as Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology and IEEE Control Systems Magazine, and is Senior Editor of Transactions on Control Systems Technology. She is IEEE CSS Distinguished Lecturer 2019-2021. She is an IEEE Fellow, member of the Norwegian Academy of Technological Sciences, and member of the Academy of the Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters.

Plenary 5

Safe and Efficient Robot Collaborative Systems for Next Generation Intelligent Industrial Co-Robots

Masayoshi Tomizuka

Cheryl and John Neerhout, Jr. Distinguished Professor
Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of California, Berkeley

Masayoshi Tomizuka

Cheryl and John Neerhout, Jr. Distinguished Professor
Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of California, Berkeley

Biography

Masayoshi Tomizuka received his Ph. D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in February 1974. In 1974, he joined the faculty of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley, where he currently holds the Cheryl and John Neerhout, Jr., Distinguished Professorship Chair. His current research interests are optimal and adaptive control, digital control, signal processing, motion control, and control problems related to robotics, precision motion control and vehicles. He served as Program Director of the Dynamic Systems and Control Program of the Civil and Mechanical Systems Division of NSF (2002- 2004). He served as Technical Editor of the ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement and Control, J-DSMC (1988-93), and Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics (1997-99). Prof. Tomizuka is a Life Fellow of the ASME and IEEE and a Fellow of IFAC (International Federation of Automatic Control). He is the recipient of the Charles Russ Richards Memorial Award (ASME, 1997), the Rufus Oldenburger Medal (ASME, 2002), the John R. Ragazzini Award (American Automatic Control Council, AACC, 2006), Lifetime Achievement Award (Technical Committee on Mechatrnic Systems, IFAC 2013) and the Richard Bellman Control Heritage Award (AACC, 2018).